Author Topic: Locking diff.  (Read 749 times)

Offline whipper.snapper

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Locking diff.
« on: June 16, 2024, 07:23:10 PM »
So I want to get a locking rear diff for my 87 Chevy v10, I’ve read into it a little bit and I think a Eaton E-Locker is a good example of the best fit for me. I want it to be selectable, and I want it to be a full lock as opposed to limited slip. But they are quite pricy.

Do y’all have any suggestions of certain products or routes I can get this done?

Thanks in advance fellas!


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Offline VileZambonie

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2024, 05:18:56 PM »
You have a V10 which is 4x4. Limited Slip would be my choice. Why would you prefer a locker over LSD?
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Offline Shifty

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2024, 05:31:34 PM »
Great for drag racing, maybe mud-boggin'.....
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Offline whipper.snapper

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2024, 06:40:45 AM »
A locker is better IMO because you get the best of both worlds, it’s a fully locked diff when you need it to be (I.e stuck off-roading, pulling a boat out of the water, or slick roads maybe) and then a fully open diff when you are doing your regular road driving.


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Offline Mike81K10

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2024, 06:24:38 PM »
My truck has a fully lock diff (posi-traction) and I like it. Used to haul a boat and I had no problem at boat ramps.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2024, 06:26:10 PM by Mike81K10 »
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Offline whipper.snapper

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2024, 09:38:01 AM »
My understanding is a posi is not a “fully lockable” differential. A posi has clutches and springs that offer a certain amount of lock between the two rear axles.


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Offline Mike81K10

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2024, 09:51:58 AM »
You are right, posi clutches can slip if the traction is unequal to the tires. I believe locker have more noise and are not as street friendly.

I had a Chevy Dealership repair my truck trucks rear end when my rear end went out on the road (gear teeth shot through my diff cover) and I bought a used rear end (shipped from PA that ended up needing new axles) and the technician did a posi-traction conversion.
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Online bd

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2024, 12:01:39 PM »
IMHO - Unless money is irrelevant and you just want a locker, it is prudent to build the axle for the way the truck will be most used.  You should avoid using a locker for more than a few feet on any paved or hard surface that exhibits high tire traction, otherwise you impose undue stresses on the drivetrain, especially while turning.  If stress is extreme the weakest link may break, saddling you with an expensive repair.  If you foresee a lot of off-roading in loose or bouldery environments, a locker can be of great use.  For mostly street and occasional offroad applications, posi-traction is a better solution.  Even for frequent offroad use, a locker up front with a posi in the rear is a good combination.  For daily offroad use, air lockers front and rear are hard to beat but perform best under the control of experienced drivers.

With that stated, an air locker can prove significantly better than an e-locker in technical terrain because of the inherent delays involved during engagement/disengagement when in tense situations.  However, e-lockers are simpler, hence, notably less expensive and less intimidating to install.
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Offline Dr_Snooz

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2024, 09:44:26 PM »
I got a smoking deal on my first LSD at East Coast Gear Supply. Then when I had questions trying to install it, they were super helpful and patient with this newb. When my next axle build happened, I made one call and had them send me everything I needed. Super great guys. I don't think I'll bother building another axle. I'll just have them ship me a built one.

I opted for LSDs because they are the most liveable. I didn't have to drill holes in my pumpkin, or run lines through the truck. If they fail, they don't grenade. They just turn into open diffs. They don't want to plow straight on windy roads like lockers do. They won't bind up if you forget you engaged them. The traction now is truly amazing. My muddy driveway is like paved road. A locker is technically better, but only by one measure.

My buddy opted for a locker in his Toyota, and it's been a lot more fiddly. He had trouble routing the air line in a way that it wouldn't get caught in the ring gear. He had to find a place for the compressor, and engaging it is a production. Do what's right for you, of course, but if this is your first foray, then realize that there's a lot of things to consider beyond what the car shows test.

I mention it because for at least one of the situations you list (slick roads), a locker might be less than wonderful, especially if those roads aren't straight.
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Offline whipper.snapper

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2024, 10:32:25 AM »
Great info guys, thanks.


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Offline Captkaos

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Re: Locking diff.
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2024, 10:32:15 AM »
I ran Airlockers on my 97 TJ, it was the first and last time I used them.  you have to have a compressor and you are constantly chasing air leaks and if you have not air, you have not locker.
My Jeep currently is getting Ox lockers.
IMO limited slip is the ticket for everyday driving.  Lockers are Rough on drivetrains as there is no allowance for slip..  Just my opinion.