Author Topic: break in  (Read 5795 times)

Offline Stewart G Griffin

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Re: break in
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2015, 09:45:29 PM »
The procedure I follow is to fire it up and let it idle up to temp. Then my cam break in was a slow steady sweep from 1500rpm to 3000rpm and back for 30 mins.  Then I drained the oil and was ready to go.

Engine should NEVER EVER idle during new break in with a hydraulic cam. The cam gets oiled by the crankshaft hence the start it and get it up to 2000+ as quick as humanly possible.


i thought the cam was under oil pressure?  Wow.  Looks like i got to do more reading.

http://animagraffs.com/how-a-car-engine-works/
« Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 05:07:22 PM by Stewart G Griffin »

Offline Dr_Snooz

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Re: break in
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2015, 08:12:48 PM »
Not controversial to me.  That sounds exactly right, and agrees with the GM published procedure.

Man, I learn something new every time I log on to this site. Where can I find that procedure? Most car makers I've seen advise you to baby it, don't rev too high or drive at a steady speed for the first 500 miles or so. I was highly skeptical of the Motoman procedure when I first heard of it, but it's how I do it now.

I heard a rumor years ago that GM would start up new engines fresh off the line and run them wide open to break them in. Not sure if there's any truth to that, but it's interesting.
1986 GMC C-2500 Crew Cab, 7.4L, TH400 -- RIP Chester

1989 Chevy Suburban V-2500, 5.7L, TH400

1990 Chevy C-3500 Ext. Cab, 7.4L, 3L80

Offline rich weyand

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Re: break in
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2015, 11:38:06 PM »
Not controversial to me.  That sounds exactly right, and agrees with the GM published procedure.

Man, I learn something new every time I log on to this site. Where can I find that procedure? Most car makers I've seen advise you to baby it, don't rev too high or drive at a steady speed for the first 500 miles or so. I was highly skeptical of the Motoman procedure when I first heard of it, but it's how I do it now.

I heard a rumor years ago that GM would start up new engines fresh off the line and run them wide open to break them in. Not sure if there's any truth to that, but it's interesting.

Link is in one of my posts above.  Says JEGS, but it is word-for-word same as the procedure I got with my GM crate 350.
Rich

"Working Girl": 1978 K-10 RCSB 350/TH350/NP203 +2/+3 Tuff Country lift

Offline Dr_Snooz

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Re: break in
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2015, 10:27:16 AM »
I wonder why the original owner's manuals stipulate a "slow-and-steady" break-in while their crate division recommends basically the opposite?
1986 GMC C-2500 Crew Cab, 7.4L, TH400 -- RIP Chester

1989 Chevy Suburban V-2500, 5.7L, TH400

1990 Chevy C-3500 Ext. Cab, 7.4L, 3L80

Offline Captkaos

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Re: break in
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2015, 08:56:23 PM »
Not Controversial to me either.  On flat tappet setups I would prelube the motor to get oil to the top, crank it up and get it up to RPM of about 1000, make sure it will run and start at 1800-2000 rpms for about 15-20 minutes.  When I am done with that, using non detergent zddp oil, I get it down to idle, verify everything is ok, swap the filter out and drive it like I stole it.  With a number of full throttle runs and part throttle runs keeping an eye on the temp and pressure.  If everything is ok, I drive it normally and if I want WOT and after about 500 miles replace the oil.  We have built one, broke it in and took it the the races all in the same night before.... back in the day.

Offline Chris.Guerrero

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Re: break in
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2015, 03:06:56 PM »
OK it's been a long time coming for that I am in the final steps of rebuild my sbc 355 with vortec heads. My question is about breaking in the new motor. Everything is brand new inside except for crank and rods but they were reconditioned. I want to use rotella t or delo 400 15w40 with either the lucas zinc additive or the hyper lube additive. Or do you guys recommend break in oil. If I go that route I would purchase comp cam break in cause my cam Is a flat tappet. Also can some on explain to me the best break in procedure for an engine. I know I have to put plenty of assembly lube on bottom of lifter but I'm confused on the whole process after reading so many different opinions. Someone please shead some light on this subject. Thanks in advance

Hi dieselman123,

The Rotella Triple Protection 15W40 with its higher zinc anti-wear content would be great  for your rebuilt Chevrolet SBC 355 (today’s Rotella T Triple Protection 15W40 has a zinc anti-wear content of approx. 1,200 ppm).

-The Shell Rotella Team