Author Topic: Project GoJo  (Read 2182 times)

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #45 on: May 16, 2018, 08:57:06 AM »
The bed is finished and looks great.  I will get some photos soon.   Next I need to get the gas gauge working. Then the stereo goes in.  I built a subwoofer cabinet to go behind the seat and it fits well and looks good.  The cabinet is designed around a 10" Kenwood woofer I got from a neighbor a couple of years ago.  I researched the woofer to figure out what design of cabinet to put it in, and apparently it's a decent quality speaker.  I made a sealed box with .64 cubic foot inside volume and the initial sound testing is very good.  Or course it may sound like crap inside the truck. We'll see.

I also got new carpet.  I don't know what direction I will go after that, but one possibility is to raise the suspension 3 or 4 inches and probably put on slightly taller tires.  I'm not sure about the wheels.  Black wheels are not my favorite but I'm at a real loss about what would look good on this truck.  Of course, that's all big money and a lot of work so it will be easy to put off.

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #46 on: May 17, 2018, 08:06:27 PM »
I did some more troubleshooting and man, the factory GM gauge cluster is junk.  What a pile of crap.  It's about the quality of a kid's cheap toy! Between the screws of different sizes, the 4 kinds of cheap plastic, and the lousy "circuit board" on the back with its half-way connector, I am surprised it all still works.  Anyhow, using the same grounding point, I'm getting the same ohm reading at the connector to the instrument panel as I'm getting from the sender itself, so that's good.  That rules out the sender wire being bad somewhere.  It didn't occur to me to check the ground that the gauges are using, as that's clearly a possible problem area.  I also have no idea how much gas in the tank but I'll keep assuming that the gauge didn't magically fix itself and is still reading wrong.  So I think the gauge grounding is the next thing to check.

I pulled off the dash pad for the first time and that wasn't too bad.  I got a peek at some of the disconnected wires under there.  I swapped out the "Travel Quest"dash  badge with a Silverado one that I got on Ebay.

Offline VileZambonie

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2018, 06:07:45 AM »
lol, yes it is! Dakota makes the best aftermarket cluster imo. Despite being meticulous with a refurbishing it is almost guaranteed the cluster will still exhibit the design flaws. It's part of the character :)

To the left of the dash vent under the dash is a grounding bus. Check the connections and ground there
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Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2018, 10:26:53 AM »
... Despite being meticulous with a refurbishing it is almost guaranteed the cluster will still exhibit the design flaws. It's part of the character :)

It occurred to me that the crappy design of the square body gauge cluster is probably not much different than any gauge cluster of the era or maybe even today.

To the left of the dash vent under the dash is a grounding bus. Check the connections and ground there

Fantastic.  Great to know.  I was going to install a dedicated ground  bus anyhow, but if GM put one in, then I need to look at that.  Where exactly is it located?

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2018, 05:02:10 PM »
A few pics of the inside bed paint job. I am very happy with the results.  I took these photos in the garage so they're not brightly lit. One flaw is the number of small dents. Not a show truck but the bed is hugely improved.









I'm still waiting on the delivery of a rubber bed mat which may show up today.  We'll see.  I'm out of town for a week so don't look for any new posts for a while.

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #50 on: May 30, 2018, 09:02:55 PM »
The bed mat is still back ordered via Amazon.  I talked to Brother's Trucks who seems to sell the same mat that Amazon has and they're back ordered 4 to 5 weeks.

The AC quit blowing cold air the last couple of weeks.  Today I replaced the Schrader valves, re-evacuated the system, and refilled with 134a.  It's blowing cold but my neighbor is convinced it's not as cold as it could be, which seems right.  One of the Freon fittings is an old R12 fitting so I have to wonder if the AC system is as much of a Frankenstein's monster as the truck in general.

This weekend I will put the stereo system and new carpet in.

Finally, the turn signals stopped flashing.  I put in a "heavy duty" flasher module and they're working again.

The tranny continues to leak fluid somewhere near the pan.

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #51 on: June 02, 2018, 04:03:28 PM »
Took one last crack at the AC system this morning:  Replaced the orifice tube, installed the R12 to 134a screw-on adapter to the  high side service port, and evac'd and re-filled the system with 3 ounces of oil and around 3 pounds of 134a.

One big problem was the orifice tube had metal shavings on it, so that's not good. See pic below.

The whole ordeal is a reminder of what I aready know: When dealing with an unknown system, it's best to start from the ground up and assume the worst.  In retrospect, maybe I should have cleaned out the system (is that even possible?) and started, a new compressor and all new seals and valves.

The metal shavings could have been from some previous failure, or the compressor could be eating itself right now. :)

Anyhow, it blew cool air in testing so we'll see how it does over the new few days. It's hot as heck in Houston, as expected this time of year.


Offline bd

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #52 on: June 02, 2018, 06:40:16 PM »
The chunky debris is metal and Teflon seal fragments from the compressor.  The brown mud is disintegrating desiccant washed out of the accumulator.  A minute accumulation of chunky debris is somewhat normal and no reason for concern, unless the compressor is noisy.  However, if you did not flush the condenser, hoses and evaporator, and then replace the accumulator, system performance will not be up to par and residual debris will wash into and clog the orifice screen again.  Next time you open the system for service, plan on flushing the condenser, evaporator and interconnecting hoses, installing another orifice tube and draining the old oil out of the compressor, before adding the proper amount of oil to the system, evacuating and recharging with SUVA.  Avoid flushing the compressor!

The truck is coming along nicely!
Rich
It's difficult to know just how much you don't know, until you know it....
In other words... if people learn by making mistakes, by now I should know just about everything!!
87 R10 Silverado Fleetside 355 MPFI 700R4 3.42 Locker (aka Rusty, aka Mater)

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #53 on: June 04, 2018, 09:04:38 AM »
...Next time you open the system for service, plan on flushing the condenser, evaporator and interconnecting hoses...

Thanks for the details. Those are helpful.

Can you provide any guidance on what equipment to use to flush the system?  I assume that some kind of pressurized gas and solvent are sprayed into one tube to push out whatever is in the lines? Or is each piece removed or disconnected and flushed individually?  I guess the major parts are the condenser, evaporator, and metal and rubber lines connecting everything.  Clearly the dryer/accumulator should be replaced and you said the compressor should not be flushed which makes sense.

This weekend I started on the stereo install but only got about 3 hours of actual work in.  I got the seat, carpet, rubber floor liner, and dash removed.  I installed  the 4x10 (dual voice coil, dual tweeter) speaker in the center dash location, under-mounted, so it won't interfere with the dash pad.  I am not convinced this speaker will  sound great, but it will be better than nothing. The factory connector for the stereo power wires was cut off, but I was able to identify the wires by color (yellow, orange, black, brown, grey).  I soldered on bullet connectors to the necessary wires (ground, 12v constant, and 12v ignition) and soldered the mating connectors to the wiring harness for the stereo head unit.  Using a multimeter I tested the wires to make sure that, yes, they do provide what they should at the right times.  I also prepared a wire for the amplifier remote turn-on. Normally I would run new power and ground wires for a stereo system to help ensure a noise-free system,  but took the lazy route here.

So not a lot was accomplished but small steps forward.

The radio head unit has to be supported by a rear strap because the knobs are not strong enough to hold it in place.  The stereo manual makes this clear, and it's obvious from assembling the thing that it does need rear support.  However there's no great way to hang the metal strap from above, behind the radio.  The AC controls are in the way so I can't run anything from there. The only other thing above the rear of the radio is a plastic air duct and I refuse to screw into that.  I will weld up an adjustable rod that will run from the back of the radio to the metal dash under the radio.  That should be plenty strong to support the it, but it's another hour or two of work to fit and fabricate that.

Offline bd

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #54 on: June 04, 2018, 12:42:50 PM »
To effectively flush the A/C system use a specialized tool (image) or pay a professional.  The process is rather messy because it involves using compressed shop air to force a specialized liquid solvent through the individual system components (condenser, evaporator, lines and hoses).  Oily effluent blows everywhere.  The A/C compatible solvent won't chemically react with the components, refrigerant oil or the refrigerant and will boil off and completely purge during system evacuation just prior to recharging.  Separating the hose connections is recommended to install new HNBR (green) o-rings coated with A/C mineral oil.  Don't use PAG oil to lubricate the o-rings.  If the orifice tube screen is not heavily impacted by debris, it can be rinsed with some engine starting fluid and the o-rings relubricated with A/C mineral oil.  The compressor should be drained and then refilled with an appropriate type and volume of oil.  If the compressor is noisy, now is a great opportunity to replace it.  The balance of oil to be added to the system can be poured directly into the accumulator just prior to installation.  Avoid using the 2 oz cans of oil charge to add oil to the system.

The support strap attaching to the rear of the radio generally comes upward from the lower dash panel, just as you have in mind.
Rich
It's difficult to know just how much you don't know, until you know it....
In other words... if people learn by making mistakes, by now I should know just about everything!!
87 R10 Silverado Fleetside 355 MPFI 700R4 3.42 Locker (aka Rusty, aka Mater)

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #55 on: June 10, 2018, 06:21:43 PM »
Slow but steady process.  I got the radio mounted and plugged into the wiring harness.  The previous owner relocated the battery to under the cab and put a large positive battery terminal on the frame near the right front control arm. I ran power wires for the amp from this terminal and the battery negative terminal into the cab through an existing firewall grommet and along the floor to the rear of the cab.  In the past I have always run all power wires for a stereo directly from the battery terminals because when the power for the different components is all tied to the same pair of terminals, it's supposed to eliminate noise in the system.  The positive power wire has an inline fuse near where it connects to the binding post.  I cut a small flat 1/4" thick plywood board, put some grey felt on it,  screwed it to the back of the cab, and screwed the amp to that.   I did notice when I fired up the truck that the stereo front panel was displaying the (incorrect) time, so that was good because it's getting power.  That was 3 hours of work and it's about all I can do tonight.
 
One step forward, 2 steps back:  The key is stuck in the ignition cylinder.  Great.  Probably I will have to replace the ignition cylinder but that's what, another hour of work  on the GM tilt steering column?  That's like a 15 step procedure to get in that deep :)  Fun.  Fortunately I have the tools to work on a GM tilt column like a steering wheel puller, lock plate tool, and pivot pin puller.

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #56 on: June 25, 2018, 08:29:43 PM »
Can anyone tell me which wires are which here on the windshield wiper assembly?  All I know for sure is that #5 (which is supposed to be purple) turns on the high speed wipers. I'm hoping to find a good way to ground the thing.  The thing looks to be mounted using rubber vibration pads so I don't know if it's supposed to ground using those bolts are not.

Wire #2 is black with a blue tracer but I'm not convinced that's ground.  The other wires are all not black.


Offline bd

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #57 on: June 25, 2018, 11:30:49 PM »
The wiper motor grounds through the wiper switch.  That is, the wiper switch controls the motor ground rather than power to the motor.
Original colors, circuit numbers and functions:

1 - (gray #91B) low-speed motor winding ground to cam operated park switch inside the w/wiper motor assembly
2 - (black/blue #97) park function ground through the w/wiper switch

3 - (white #93) I+ into the w/wiper motor directly from the Wiper fuse
4 - (gray #91A) low-speed motor winding ground through the w/wiper switch
5 - (purple #92) high-speed motor winding ground through the w/wiper switch

Reference: 1983 Wiring Manual
Rich
It's difficult to know just how much you don't know, until you know it....
In other words... if people learn by making mistakes, by now I should know just about everything!!
87 R10 Silverado Fleetside 355 MPFI 700R4 3.42 Locker (aka Rusty, aka Mater)

Offline ken4444

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #58 on: July 17, 2018, 06:52:19 PM »
The wiper motor grounds through the wiper switch. 

Thanks for the details. It looks like I'll have to disassemble the steering column to at least check that switch and possibly replace it.  I need to replace that plastic tube at the lower part of the column anyhow.

I was looking into flushing an AC system and it doesn't look difficult at all. My Local O'Reiley may have a loaner flush tool. I am tempted to throw more money at this thing and replace the AC compressor and flush the various parts of the system while I have it apart.  Two questions:

1) Can this type of condenser be flushed?  I am reading that some condensers in newer vehicles can't be flushed because the particles stay trapped inside.
2) Can anyone recommend a correct compressor part number or brand?  This one has a serpentine belt.  The original label is too faded to read.  Rockauto shows a Delco 15-20185 but these have poor reviews, but it has a 2 year warranty.

Offline bd

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Re: Project GoJo
« Reply #59 on: July 17, 2018, 07:35:51 PM »
Don't expect the factory A/C to blow much cooler than ~54° F in a hot and humid climate.  The OEM tube & fin condenser can be reverse flushed effectively without concern.  Some of the newer serpentine condensers can be a problem using carport techniques. 




If this ^^^^ is the extent of shavings that you discovered in the original orifice tube screen and the new orifice screen is still clean, the risk is minimal and I wouldn't be too concerned over it.  Was the old compressor making noise or leaking refrigerant?  Is the clutch face worn from slippage?  If your answers are no and the orifice tube is clear, the compressor should be okay to reuse.
Rich
It's difficult to know just how much you don't know, until you know it....
In other words... if people learn by making mistakes, by now I should know just about everything!!
87 R10 Silverado Fleetside 355 MPFI 700R4 3.42 Locker (aka Rusty, aka Mater)